Wednesday, August 27, 2014

After Fatal Accident, Chicago Area Woman Reaching Out to Teens

Via Comcast SportsNet in Chicago:

The 20 year woman who, while under the influence of inhalants, ran over and killed a 5 year old girl spoke to thirty Chicago teens last week, warning them about the dangers of drugs.  She is to be sentenced next month for aggravated DUI and reckless homicide.

With a photo of the young victim on the table next to her, she told the teens she started using drugs, when she was 12 years old. She also discussed being bullied and struggling with finding her identity as an adopted child.  At 15 she moved to heavier drugs and prescription pills to cope with a pit bull attack that left her face scarred. At 16 she entered a treatment center in Utah and stayed there until she graduated high school.When she returned home, depression kicked back in and she started using again. 

On September 3, 2012 she noted she made "the terrible decision to drive under the influence. I passed out behind the wheel of the car. My car went over four lanes of traffic and hit the pedestrian family. I turned around after I got out of the car, and I saw two people laying on the ground — a woman screaming 'My miniƱa!' and a little girl. I ran over as best I could and tried giving the girl CPR and held the mother's hand, and when the cops arrived, I got up and said, 'I did this. Will you take me away? I was driving under the influence. I did this." 

The following day  officers told her the young girl had died and she was charged with the accident. She said she has been sober since and has been volunteering at a recovery center with troubled kids while helping to start a "Step Up! & Say No To Drugs!" campaign.


Tuesday, August 26, 2014

West Virginia father arrested for child neglect

Via WDTV 5 News in West Virginia


A man in Morgantown, West Virginia was arrested for child neglect on Sunday after allegedly huffing a can of duster in front of his daughter. Police found the man passed out and incoherent on the rail train with a can of duster in his hand. His young daughter was in a stroller just a few feet away. The man told police that he had not huffed the whole can that day.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Additional Charges in Deadly Colorado Crash

Via the Pueblo Chieftain in Colorado

Last March a 31 year old man drove his car through the basement of home, killing a 46 year old man and injuring his wife.A judge recently found probable cause to try the driver on charges of vehicular homicide, manslaughter, and leaving the scene of an accident along with a second vehicular homicide charge alleging he was under the influence of inhalants and a charge of vehicular homicide by reckless driving.

A Pueblo district judge found probable cause to try a Pueblo man on charges of vehicular homicide, manslaughter and leaving the scene of an accident for a March incident in which he’s accused of driving a car through the basement of a South Side home. - See more at: http://www.chieftain.com/news/2834385-120/montour-car-compressed-driving#sthash.TvU2w0c0.dpuf
A Pueblo district judge found probable cause to try a Pueblo man on charges of vehicular homicide, manslaughter and leaving the scene of an accident for a March incident in which he’s accused of driving a car through the basement of a South Side home.
Victor Montour
Victor Montour
Prosecutors have added a second vehicular homicide charge against Victor Montour, 31, this time alleging he was driving under the influence of inhalants when he wrecked his wife’s car into the home on the 1900 block of Hollywood Drive, killing Johnnie Hagerman, 46, and wounding his wife.
Montour also is facing a charge of vehicular homicide by reckless driving.
At Friday’s preliminary hearing, special prosecutor Thom Ledoux, district attorney for the 11th Judicial District in Fremont County, introduced evidence that Montour had been at the South Side Walmart store before the wreck and bought a can of compressed air.
Police testified that security video from the Walmart shows Montour purchasing the air can, for which a receipt was found in the car and the can itself found in the Hagermans’ home.
Under Ledoux’s questioning, Pueblo police Cpl. Jimmy Quintana testified that compressed air cans can be used for huffing, similar to aerosol paint cans or glue.
LeDoux worked to match that information with a witness’ description of the incident, who said it appeared the car Montour is accused of driving sat about two car lengths back from the intersection of Hollywood Drive and Ivywood Lane before it accelerated quickly through the intersection, lost control and crashed through the home.
Quintana testified that the car was going between 29 and 41 mph when the crash happened and there was no sign of braking.
But Defense Attorney Adam Schultz got Quintana to testify that compressed air cans don’t contain the same toxic chemicals found in paint or glue.
It was a point he stressed with District Judge David Crockenberg, arguing that even if the effect of huffing compressed air is similar, his client couldn’t have been driving under the influence of any drug or chemical since there was no chemical in the air can.
Crockenberg still found probable cause to move ahead with that charge as well as the others.
Witnesses, including Hagerman’s wife, saw a man jump from the vehicle and run from the scene.
The car was registered to Montour’s wife, Christy Marlett, who is facing an accessory charge and a count of false reporting. Police collected cellphone records from Marlett and from a phone found at the scene, connected to Montour.
Police also traced a series of calls between Marlett and a number connected to Victor Montelongo that happened after the accident.
Cpl. Raymond Purvis testified that Montelongo lived at a home nearby and told officers he used to be married to Montour’s aunt.
He said Montour knocked on his door the night of the accident and asked to use his phone, then left before a woman called back.
Montour entered a plea of not guilty. A trial has tentatively been set for February.
- See more at: http://www.chieftain.com/news/2834385-120/montour-car-compressed-driving#sthash.TvU2w0c0.dpuf
A Pueblo district judge found probable cause to try a Pueblo man on charges of vehicular homicide, manslaughter and leaving the scene of an accident for a March incident in which he’s accused of driving a car through the basement of a South Side home.
Victor Montour
Victor Montour
Prosecutors have added a second vehicular homicide charge against Victor Montour, 31, this time alleging he was driving under the influence of inhalants when he wrecked his wife’s car into the home on the 1900 block of Hollywood Drive, killing Johnnie Hagerman, 46, and wounding his wife.
Montour also is facing a charge of vehicular homicide by reckless driving.
At Friday’s preliminary hearing, special prosecutor Thom Ledoux, district attorney for the 11th Judicial District in Fremont County, introduced evidence that Montour had been at the South Side Walmart store before the wreck and bought a can of compressed air.
Police testified that security video from the Walmart shows Montour purchasing the air can, for which a receipt was found in the car and the can itself found in the Hagermans’ home.
Under Ledoux’s questioning, Pueblo police Cpl. Jimmy Quintana testified that compressed air cans can be used for huffing, similar to aerosol paint cans or glue.
LeDoux worked to match that information with a witness’ description of the incident, who said it appeared the car Montour is accused of driving sat about two car lengths back from the intersection of Hollywood Drive and Ivywood Lane before it accelerated quickly through the intersection, lost control and crashed through the home.
Quintana testified that the car was going between 29 and 41 mph when the crash happened and there was no sign of braking.
But Defense Attorney Adam Schultz got Quintana to testify that compressed air cans don’t contain the same toxic chemicals found in paint or glue.
It was a point he stressed with District Judge David Crockenberg, arguing that even if the effect of huffing compressed air is similar, his client couldn’t have been driving under the influence of any drug or chemical since there was no chemical in the air can.
Crockenberg still found probable cause to move ahead with that charge as well as the others.
Witnesses, including Hagerman’s wife, saw a man jump from the vehicle and run from the scene.
The car was registered to Montour’s wife, Christy Marlett, who is facing an accessory charge and a count of false reporting. Police collected cellphone records from Marlett and from a phone found at the scene, connected to Montour.
Police also traced a series of calls between Marlett and a number connected to Victor Montelongo that happened after the accident.
Cpl. Raymond Purvis testified that Montelongo lived at a home nearby and told officers he used to be married to Montour’s aunt.
He said Montour knocked on his door the night of the accident and asked to use his phone, then left before a woman called back.
Montour entered a plea of not guilty. A trial has tentatively been set for February.
- See more at: http://www.chieftain.com/news/2834385-120/montour-car-compressed-driving#sthash.TvU2w0c0.dpuf
A Pueblo district judge found probable cause to try a Pueblo man on charges of vehicular homicide, manslaughter and leaving the scene of an accident for a March incident in which he’s accused of driving a car through the basement of a South Side home.
Victor Montour
Victor Montour
Prosecutors have added a second vehicular homicide charge against Victor Montour, 31, this time alleging he was driving under the influence of inhalants when he wrecked his wife’s car into the home on the 1900 block of Hollywood Drive, killing Johnnie Hagerman, 46, and wounding his wife.
Montour also is facing a charge of vehicular homicide by reckless driving.
At Friday’s preliminary hearing, special prosecutor Thom Ledoux, district attorney for the 11th Judicial District in Fremont County, introduced evidence that Montour had been at the South Side Walmart store before the wreck and bought a can of compressed air.
Police testified that security video from the Walmart shows Montour purchasing the air can, for which a receipt was found in the car and the can itself found in the Hagermans’ home.
Under Ledoux’s questioning, Pueblo police Cpl. Jimmy Quintana testified that compressed air cans can be used for huffing, similar to aerosol paint cans or glue.
LeDoux worked to match that information with a witness’ description of the incident, who said it appeared the car Montour is accused of driving sat about two car lengths back from the intersection of Hollywood Drive and Ivywood Lane before it accelerated quickly through the intersection, lost control and crashed through the home.
Quintana testified that the car was going between 29 and 41 mph when the crash happened and there was no sign of braking.
But Defense Attorney Adam Schultz got Quintana to testify that compressed air cans don’t contain the same toxic chemicals found in paint or glue.
It was a point he stressed with District Judge David Crockenberg, arguing that even if the effect of huffing compressed air is similar, his client couldn’t have been driving under the influence of any drug or chemical since there was no chemical in the air can.
Crockenberg still found probable cause to move ahead with that charge as well as the others.
Witnesses, including Hagerman’s wife, saw a man jump from the vehicle and run from the scene.
The car was registered to Montour’s wife, Christy Marlett, who is facing an accessory charge and a count of false reporting. Police collected cellphone records from Marlett and from a phone found at the scene, connected to Montour.
Police also traced a series of calls between Marlett and a number connected to Victor Montelongo that happened after the accident.
Cpl. Raymond Purvis testified that Montelongo lived at a home nearby and told officers he used to be married to Montour’s aunt.
He said Montour knocked on his door the night of the accident and asked to use his phone, then left before a woman called back.
Montour entered a plea of not guilty. A trial has tentatively been set for February.
- See more at: http://www.chieftain.com/news/2834385-120/montour-car-compressed-driving#sthash.TvU2w0c0.dpuf

Inhalant Abuse in Fayetteville Arkansas

Via the NWA Online in Arkansas:

The woman was found "face down, legs crossed, her body as still as the water pooled around her."  Two cans of computer duster were in her lap and a third can floated not far away. A receipt in her purse revealed she had bought the cans that afternoon. The state crime lab reported her cause of death as difluoroethane toxicity and drowning. Twelve days later, another Fayetteville woman died after huffing computer dusters in a hotel bathroom.

The article notes that in Arkansas, according to statute 5-60-116, it is a class B misdemeanor to huff products to achieve a condition of intoxication and that the state bans the possession and distribution of nitrous oxide.  Additionally, in Arkansas, 6.1 percent of eight-graders reported using inhalants in 2009 compared to the national average of 3.8 percent.


Repeat Huffer Arrested in California

Via the Ukiah Daily Journal in California:

Police responded to a call of a man huffing from an aerosol can with his pants down. They located a 36 year old man and noticed he had a can with him and that he was currently on probation for possessing inhalants.  He was placed under arrest on suspicion of possessing an inhalant and violating probation.

The next morning officers responded to a call for a subject who had stolen several cans from a store and it was believed he was huffing from them in the back of the building. Employees of the store noticed he had inhaled from the can before leaving the store, discarded the can, and vomited before proceeding to the back of the store with the remaining cans.  Police discovered it was the same man from the previous evening's incident. He began huffing as officers approached. He was arrested once again.

Pregnant Indiana Mom Arrested After Huffing

Via the NW Times in Indiana:

When the police arrived at the 22 year old female's door last week they thought she was suffering from a seizure.  The woman, who is six months pregnant, awoke from the officer's knocking on the front door, screamed and immediately began huffing a duster. Police broke down the front door and removed the can from the woman's hand.

Officers were there to serve her a warrant for an inhalant abuse incident from July 9. She told police she was addicted to huffing, was transported to a medical center for evaluation and then to jail.  The baby's father told police he had called them previously hoping she would be arrested because he had found her unconscious several times before.

Tennessee Man Crashes Car into Telephone Pole After Huffing Behind the Wheel

Via the Times News in Tennessee:

An 18 year old man crashed his car into a telephone pole after huffing computer duster.  Last Wednesday evening, a deputy arrived at his home to investigate a vehicle leaving the scene of an accident. The man's mom told him that her son had arrived home "high" on inhalants and the man tested poorly on field sobriety tests. He admitted to huffing the computer duster before leaving his residence and was charged with DUI, failure to maintain proper control, leaving the scene of an accident with property damage, no insurance, and seatbelt violation.

Huff & Puff: A 52-year-old woman was having too much fun in front of an office supply store in West Columbia. Cops found the woman on the ground; she confessed that she’d had a few beers and said she’d call someone to pick her up. When she stood up, items fell from her bag. When the officer handed her one of the items (a bottle of cleaner), the woman inhaled it in front of the cop to get a rush. If she would’ve just waited a few minutes she could’ve been huffing with whoever was going to pick her up. She was arrested. - See more at: http://www.free-times.com/news/woman-inhales-cleaner-despite-police-presence-082014#sthash.zWTARsgS.dpuf
Puff: A 52-year-old woman was having too much fun in front of an office supply store in West Columbia. Cops found the woman on the ground; she confessed that she’d had a few beers and said she’d call someone to pick her up. When she stood up, items fell from her bag. When the officer handed her one of the items (a bottle of cleaner), the woman inhaled it in front of the cop to get a rush. If she would’ve just waited a few minutes she could’ve been huffing with whoever was going to pick her up. She was arrested. - See more at: http://www.free-times.com/news/woman-inhales-cleaner-despite-police-presence-082014#sthash.zWTARsgS.dpuf
Huff & Puff: A 52-year-old woman was having too much fun in front of an office supply store in West Columbia. Cops found the woman on the ground; she confessed that she’d had a few beers and said she’d call someone to pick her up. When she stood up, items fell from her bag. When the officer handed her one of the items (a bottle of cleaner), the woman inhaled it in front of the cop to get a rush. If she would’ve just waited a few minutes she could’ve been huffing with whoever was going to pick her up. She was arrested. - See more at: http://www.free-times.com/news/woman-inhales-cleaner-despite-police-presence-082014#sthash.zWTARsgS.dpuf

Minnesota Youth Caught Huffing in a Park in Duluth

Via the Duluth News Tribune:

 The police report for August 18th notes the Hibbing police department had to be called to address the issue of two juveniles huffing substances in a park.

Body of Man Found Behind Shopping Plaza Identified

Via the Journal Star in Illinois:

The body found behind a shopping center last week has been identified as 36 year old Ryan Sailors.

The article notes that in 2009, he started using inhalants to help mask the pain of losing his father to lung cancer. Within the past five years he had struggled with addiction and he was still wearing his hospital bracelet from his last stay on July 21st after he had been found dehydrated and disoriented.


Thursday, August 21, 2014

Michigan Man Charged with Huffing Nitrous Oxide in Florida

Via the Sun Sentinel in Florida:

A 29 year old Michigan Man was arrested after he was caught huffing from a canister of nitrous oxide in a Publix parking lot.  

He was seen "laying back and 'huffing' in his car.  Inside the vehicle police found "several packages of nitrous oxide." He was taken into custody and faces charges of inhaling harmful chemicals.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

North Carolina Man Caught Huffing in Walmart Bathroom

Via the Gaffney Ledger in South Carolina:

The police blotter notes that on August 12, a North Carolina man was taken into custody after he had shoplifted three cans of computer duster from Walmart and began huffing from them in the store's bathroom.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Washington Man Caught Huffing Twice in the Same Day

Via the Nisqually Valley News in Washington:

Earlier this month police responded to a call for a man who had lost consciousness while huffing from a can.  He left before officers arrived but they found him nearby. Later that day, they were called to a local restaurant where the same man was once again abusing inhalants.  He passed out, fell on his face, and walked away.  He was cited for inhaling toxic fumes and is required to appear in court.

Man Arrested for Huffing Gold Paint in Tennessee

Via the Greenville Sun in Tennessee:

Last week a 21 year old man was charged with public intoxication and unlawful possession of an inhalant. Police responded to a call of a man "yelling at himself" and found the man with gold paint on his face and he "seemed to be intoxicated from huffing the paint." They found the bag with the gold paint he had been using and also discovered he was on probation for "possession of an inhalant."

South Carolina Woman Huffs Duster In Front of Officer

Via The State in South Carolina:

A 52 year old woman was arrested this past weekend after police found her huffing from a can of computer duster outside of a CVS Pharmacy.

Police responding to the call found the woman on the ground and as they approached, she stood up and was very unsteady on her feet. She inhaled from the can as officers were talking with her and again as they were walking to the police car, which led the officer to put her in handcuffs. She was taken to the hospital for examination and then transported to the detention facility.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Louisiana Woman Charged With Inhalant Abuse - Third Time in Three Weeks

Via the News Star in Louisiana:

A 47 year old woman is charged with inhalant abuse after police officers found her huffing from computer dusters in a car outside a Rite Aid.   She was slumped over in the driver's seat, incoherent and inhaling from the duster. Officers found a receipt for three cans of duster and she was trying to inhale from the third can when officers arrived.

She told officers that she had been caught three times in three weeks- once at a school, once at a Walmart, and then at the Rite Aid. She also noted she had first started abusing inhalants 21 years ago "due to medical reasons."